PACTIMO REWARDS(0)  |  FREE SHIPPING ON $50+ ORDERS  |  877-291-6238  |  NEED HELP?   “US “British “Euro”

Top 5 Tips to Organize Your Weekly Club Rides

February 15, 2017 2 Comments

Top 5 Tips to Organize Your Weekly Club Rides

"...we're afforded the means to help put the ride together effectively with the tools we have today more than ever."

by David Newcomer / Customer Service Manager

Getting together with your team and taking the time to ride is one of the most beautiful parts of our sport. The lifelong friendships, shared laughs, and connections made on the bike are among my favorite experiences. Period.

In a world of social media, we’re unique in our tangible experiences – and not to knock SnapFace too much – we’re afforded the means to help put the ride together effectively with the tools we have today more than ever. Still, there are some basics that can help make your group ride a successful one and that’s what we want to share with you today.

  1. Plan in advance – A standing ride makes sense, but if your team doesn’t have one, make sure you give a week’s notice or so to make sure people can plan to attend.
  2. Make rides Inclusive, not Exclusive – Invite everyone from the team and others you know who ride! This is a great time to make new connections and everyone has something to offer. Taking the time to welcome new members or people who may not be as familiar with this beautiful sport will help build a strong team that grows.
  3. Start and end at a convenient place and time – Coffee or beer sponsor? No brainer, right? And if someone needs to drop off, they still know where to go.
  4. Be safe. Plan safe routes and ride responsibly – As ambassadors of the sport (and your team and sponsors), it’s imperative that we set a good example. Group rides can be challenging for motorists to understand, so stick to no more than two-abreast, obey traffic signals and be courteous.
  5. Ride speed is dictated by the slowest rider, not fastest – It’s a group ride, after all. Take it easy and enjoy the time with your team. Maybe set a couple designated sprints, but re-group afterward. Most of us ride solo for the majority of our miles. If you’ve got a big group, consider splitting based on pace and ability, but otherwise, sit in and enjoy the ride.

Group rides can be one of the best experiences a rider has. When so much of our time is spent training alone, the opportunity to ride with friends can breathe new life into the activity. Conversely, if miss-managed, it can also be an unpleasant – even isolating or discouraging activity. Keep safety and inclusion forefront in your mind and it’s hard to go wrong.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

About the Author

David, Customer Service ManagerA lifelong commuter and amateur racer in road, CX and MTB, David Newcomer has experience with just about every aspect of our sport. A former race director of the Bob Cook Memorial Mt. Evans Hill Climb, and Executive Director of one of the largest cycling clubs in Colorado, he brings a wide range of experience to share with others. David is the Customer Service Manager at Pactimo and host of our podcast "On the Road with Pactimo." You can reach him directly at dnewcomer@pactimo.com

 



2 Responses

David
David

February 27, 2017

Thanks, Mark! Appreciate the feedback and really enjoy hearing about others working to expand our sport. Keep up the good work!

Mark Burke
Mark Burke

February 25, 2017

Great advice…Clubs can be intimidating for many. I’m the Ride Director for the Williamsport Bicycle Club (USA-PA). Inclusive Ride Planning and Management is key for our club and from my perspective, to the growth of cycling overall in the US, where cycling isn’t mainstream. Your 5 points are spot on. I like to talk about #5 because pace is often what creates the most tension in club rides. I’m in the process of developing our new ride leader guide. I’m crafting a few guiding principles that include helping others realize that they will both slower and faster than others. Tension creeps into groups when we forget that. Slower riders will feel left out if they are constantly dropped, and faster riders will feel unchallenged. Ride leaders play a key role in managing each participant’s enjoyment. So, I haven’t added much to the post, just an “I agree.” Thanks for posting.

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Related Stories You Might Like

  • The Art of Being Prepared

    Success on race day requires precise preparation. By Alison Powers, ALP Cycles Coaching The art of being prepared comes down to one simple thing—no surprises on race day. Preparing for race day is more than traini...

  • A More Complete Cyclist

    Being able to carry speed through a corner or sit in the draft of a peloton is free speed. By Alison Powers, ALP Cycles Coaching If there was one magic training tool that you could do to become a better, faster, a...

  • Quality Over Quantity

    With 9-14hrs of training time a week that most of us have, we have to make every single workout count. By Alison Powers, ALP Cycles Coaching For most of us, we don’t have 15-25hrs each week to train and ride our b...


Also in Training & Coaching

Team Camp 2017 - ALP Cycles Coaching
Team Camp 2017 - ALP Cycles Coaching

April 21, 2017

Last week, ALP Cycles Racing, had their team camp in Grand Junction. We call it a "team camp" instead of a "training camp", because camp was so much more than training. It was about the team; building team bonds, building team skills, and starting to think as one team. Everyone rides for the greater good of the team.

Read More

Why You Shouldn't Train Through Sickness...
Why You Shouldn't Train Through Sickness...

April 07, 2017

Lately, a lot of people are dealing with nasty seasonal viruses/flu that are going around. Athletes are a primary target because after intense training, our immune system are compromised and they can’t protect us, causing an "open window effect". That “open window effect” has a duration of about 3 to 72 hours. This is why it is very important to get enough and proper recovery especially after a hard ride, workout or race!

Read More

The Art of Being Prepared
The Art of Being Prepared

April 04, 2017

The art of being prepared comes down to one simple thing—no surprises on race day.

Preparing for race day is more than training and recovery.  Success on race day requires precise preparation. This means the things you can control should be dialed in, ready, and give you confidence to have the best performance possible.

“Fail to prepare and prepare to fail”—famous quote by someone who inspires people to get their sh*t together. 

Read More

Find us on Google+